Tag Archives: Kelly Slater

Beach cruising in J-bay

supertubes jbay accommodation

I was walking back up the beach yesterday after a paddle at Tubes- the sun was going down, some dolphins cruised past, and the water was getting that pink glow that I’ve only seen in Jeffrey’s, and it struck me-There is simply no such thing as an ordinary beach walk in J-bay.

Each time you stroll down onto the sand It’s an inspiration and truly refreshes the soul, which got me to thinking….well…why? What is it about this particular place- the stretch between Shaloha guesthouse at the top of Supertubes to the bottom of Surfers Point that is almost mystical each time you walk it?

Well there’s actually a list of possible reasons.

Lets start with what’s underfoot- an array of thousands of different species of shells rowed up liberally along the beach in tide lines, often so many that it takes a bit of a hop and a skip to avoid crushing them! There are species here found nowhere else, but it’s more the sheer abundance that strikes most people.

People come to Shaloha for the first time and after taking in the amazing views,then they go for a stroll on the beach. Little do they know that a bejewelled wonderland awaits them few feet away.

It’s priceless every time a new guest returns- a childlike gleam in their eyes and hands overflowing with shells, rocks, seaweed and other beach trinkets (we have shell collection baskets for their second walk;)

Anyway, enough about shells, this beach has history. Walking back from the surf one can’t help but think about all the legends that have passed through J-bay and crunched the sand between their toes- John Whitmore (father of South African surfing), Shorty Bronkhorst, Max Wettland, Clive barber, Bruce Gold, Terry Fitzgerald, Larry Levine, Ant(‘the Doc’) Van Den Huewel, Dane Kealoha, Shaun Tomson, Rabbit Bartholomew, Mark Richards, Tom Curren, Occy, Shane Herring, Dave Rastovich, Andy Irons, Kelly Slater and the list just goes on and on.

Each have left new lines on the walls of Supers and their footprints in the sand.

Add to this the ancient history( 180 000 years!) of beach walking as a lifestyle( the ‘strandlopers’) that has existed on this coast for millenia and you get an idea of why this place has such a magic to it……..-R